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Flickr Photo Of The Week


by Therese Powell 13 Nov 2018

Congratulations to Robert Pitney of Farmers Branch, winner of the Flickr Photo of the Week contest.

CTA TBD

 

Congratulations to Robert Pitney of Farmers Branch, the winner of the Flickr Photo of the Week. This second time Robert has grabbed the Flickr gold. He follows last week’s winner, Pankaj Sharma of Dallas.

If you would like to participate in the Flickr Photo of the Week contest, all you need to do is upload your photo to our Flickr group page. It’s fine to submit a photo you took earlier than the current week, but we are hoping that the contest will inspire you to go out and shoot something fantastic this week to share with Art&Seek users. If the picture you take involves a facet of the arts, even better. The contest week will run from Tuesday to Monday, and the Art&Seek staff will pick a winner on Friday afternoon. We’ll notify the winner through FlickrMail (so be sure to check those inboxes) and ask you to fill out a short survey to tell us a little more about yourself and the photo you took. We’ll post the winners’ photo on Tuesday.

Now here’s more from Robert.

Title of photo: “Rock Springs School”

Equipment: Nikon D750 with a 16-35mm lens, shot at 16mm

Tell us about your photo: The Rock Springs School was built in 1849. It has severed as a school, church and civic meeting hall. It is the oldest dated building still in existence in Gregg County. It was placed on the Texas Historical list in 1966. If you’ll notice in the photo, there is a black square at the center front of the top roof peek. There was a steeple there from the building’s time as a church. The steeple was burned off by wildfire about 6 years ago.

Presently, the Gladewater Museum is trying to acquire funding to restore the structure.

One of my on-going photo series is called “Texas Roadside Attractions, Culture & Scenery.” Rock Springs School was researched, the drive to Gladewater made specifically for the photo. Much of TRACS is done this way. But just as much comes from randomly driving the back roads of Texas.

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