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The High Five: Ol’ Man Winter Is Back In North Texas Today
by Eric Aasen 3 Mar 2014

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Matthew McConaughey wins an Oscar; Ol’ Man Winter is back in North Texas; what’s on your Texas bucket list; and more:

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Matthew McConaughey earned an Oscar nomination for actor in a leading role for his portrayal of Ron Woodroof in "Dallas Buyers Club." (Credit: Anne Marie Fox / Focus Features)

Matthew McConaughey on Sunday earned an Oscar for actor in a leading role for his portrayal of Ron Woodroof in “Dallas Buyers Club.”
(Credit: Anne Marie Fox / Focus Features)

Five stories that have North Texas talking: Matthew McConaughey wins an Oscar; Ol’ Man Winter is back in North Texas; what’s on your Texas bucket list; and more:

When the Academy Awards were handed out Sunday night, half of this year’s acting Oscars went to performers in Dallas Buyers Club. Dallas Buyers Club won three Oscars, including best actor for Matthew McConaughey and best supporting actor for Jared Leto. In addition to the two acting trophies, Dallas Buyers Club also earned the Oscar for makeup and hairstyling. The film had earned six Oscar nominations, including for best film. (Best picture went to “12 Years A Slave.”) Leto earned his award for playing a transgender person dying of AIDS in 1980s Dallas. In accepting it, he paid tribute to those who’ve died from the disease. “This is for the 36 million people who have lost the battle to AIDS and to those of you who’ve ever felt injustice because of who you are or who you love, tonight I stand here in front of the world with you and for you,” he said. McConaughey lost 40 pounds to play Ron Woodruff, the Dallas man who took his HIV treatment into his own hands. KERA’s Stephen Becker has more on Art&Seek. NPR also covered the big bash: Here’s a wrap-up.

  • Seems like we’re getting a blast of icy weather every couple of weeks. The latest round hit Sunday – and lots of schools are closed today, including Dallas, Plano, Arlington, Frisco, McKinney and Allen ISDs. It will remain at or below freezing for much of North Texas today. Catch up on the weather developments on KERA’s Weather Blog.
  • Texas Independence Day was Sunday. So, to celebrate, the KERA News staff figured we’d come up with a list of quintessential Texas experiences – a bucket list of things you should do in the Lone Star state before you kick the bucket. From the State Fair of Texas to visiting the missions in San Antonio. From Gruene Hall to visiting Scenic Drive in El Paso. Pack your bags, fuel up your car, and come take a tour with us across the state … and let us know what else we should add to the list.
  • After 53 years, Jack Evans married his life partner, George Harris, on Saturday. It was believed to be the first public same-sex wedding in Dallas officiated by a United Methodist minister, The Dallas Morning News reports. Evans is 84; Harris is 80. The News reports: “The ceremony was officiated by the Rev. Bill McElvaney, pastor emeritus of Northaven United Methodist Church. The trio, all in their 80s, brought celebrity through their years of North Texas activism. ‘It is not my intent to politicize this service,’ McElvaney said, ‘but suffice to say that George and Jack are offering a gift, an invitation and a challenge to the United Methodist Church to become a fully inclusive church.’ … The wedding featured more than a dozen male attendants. An opera-trained soprano, surrounded by news photographers, sang ‘The Lord’s Prayer’ from the loft.”
  • Romantic Music of Chopin is the topic for tonight’s Conversation with Jeffrey Siegel. The program will include Polonaise in A Flat, Nocturne in F and Scherzo No. 2. It’s tonight at 7:30 at the Eisemann Center in Richardson. The Eisemann says: Siegel’s Keyboard Conversations are concerts with broad, popular appeal and lively commentary, making the music more accessible and meaningful for all. Each piece is performed in its entirety and there is a question and answer session following the concert.” Siegel talks about the composers’ lives and illustrates musical themes from each work.
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