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Monday Morning Roundup
by Stephen Becker 4 Apr 2011

Today in the roundup: Bowing down to ‘Boris,’ behind the scenes at the DMA and balloons everywhere.


BOW TO BORIS: The Dallas Opera opened Boris Godunov over the weekend, and to read the reviews, this is one for the ages. “Hair-raising singing, orchestral playing that’s elegantly and excitingly tuned to the drama, splendid pageantry: the Dallas Opera Boris Godunov that opened Friday night at the Winspear Opera House would be a triumph for any opera house, anywhere,” is how Scott Cantrell leads off his dallasnews.com review. “The production, by the film director Andrei Tarkovsky, has toured all of the big houses, starting out at Covent Garden in London,” Gregory Sullivan Isaacs writes on theaterjones.com. “It is doubtful that, in its travels to houses such as those in Vienna and Venice, it received better treatment than in the able hands of the Dallas Opera.” And Art&Seek’s own Olin Chism was also charmed, reserving special praise for the title role. “Mikhail Kazakov has one of the most pleasant bass voices I’ve ever heard. It’s strong yet mellow, and it makes Boris’ every appearance something to eagerly anticipate. Add to that the fact that Kazakov is a superb actor and you have a Boris to remember.” You’re next chance to see it is Wednesday.

THE UNSEEN COLLECTION: As big as the Dallas Museum of Art is, it’s only able to display a small portion of its vast collection at any one time. What is not on display is kept in a storage facility. A few years back, the DMA was awarded a grant to update that facility, which it has finally done. It’s not open to the public, but you can get a sense of what it looks like from these pictures on the museum’s Uncrated Blog.

SEEING ORANGE: If you’ve been by the Nasher Sculpture Center in the last week or so, you certainly will remember its newest exhibition (see Jerome Weeks’ review here). For it, Turner Prize-winner Martin Creed has filled part of the lower level gallery with balloons – 9,000 in all, stacking them up to eight feet off the ground. And, as Gaile Robinson writes on dfw.com, working your way through the balloon field is, “a completely new sensory experience.”