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WaterTower Theatre's New Season


by Jerome Weeks 27 May 2010

The Addison company announced its 15th season — which contains three notable area premieres, a Horton Foote Festival entry that’s a revival of one his 1950 classics, one beloved American drama and one monstrous musical. Plus, of course, the Out of the Loop Fringe Festival.

CTA TBD

Scene from the original, 1938 Broadway staging of Our Town

The Addison company announced its 15th season — which contains three notable area premieres, a Horton Foote Festival entry that’s a revival of one his 1950 classics, one beloved American drama and one monstrous musical. Plus, of course, the Out of the Loop Fringe Festival.

Here’s the lineup:

Our Town by Thornton Wilder, Sept 27-Oct. 24. The Pulitzer Prize-winner about a day in the life of a small New England town has been a foundation stone in American culture, but according to the press release, the WaterTower promises to “re-examine this great play and bring its message to the WTT stage in a new and exciting way.”

The Lieutenant of Inishmore by Martin McDonagh, Jan. 10-Feb. 6, 2011. Another violent dark comedy from the playwright who brought us The Pillowman and The Lonesome West (recently at Stage West), Lieutenant concerns an IRA torturer who’s lost his cat. The first of McDonagh’s “Aran Islands trilogy” to be produced in North Texas, this one even tops McDonagh’s other plays when it comes to strewing the stage with body parts.

The Traveling Lady, by Horton Foote, April4-May 1. Originally produced in 1954 — roughly the same vintage as Foote’s best-known, most sentimental work, The Trip to Bountiful — was revived in 2004 by Baylor University for its first Foote festival and eventually made it off-Broadway two years later in a production directed by the head of Baylor’s graduate theater program, Marion Castleberry, who is also the founder of the festival and of the Horton Foote Society. So it makes sense that someone would give it a shot for North Texas’ own Foote festival next year. In this case, instead of an elderly woman trying to return home (as in Bountiful), a mother and daughter come to town, awaiting her husband’s release from prison.

Shooting Star, by Stephen Dietz, May 30-June 26, 2011. Dietz, the author of More Fun Than Bowling and God’s Country, splits his time between Seattle and teaching at UT-Austin. Shooting Star just premiered in Austin in February. Two former lovers, who’ve lost contact, find each other stuck in a snowed-in airport. No, it’s a wistful comedy, not an update of No Exit.

Little Shop of Horrors, by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken, July 25-Aug. 21, 2011. Seymour, who needs no introduction, must do battle with a giant, extraterrestrial plant that threatens to take  over the flower shop and possibly the earth. The popular off-Broadway musical comedy was inspired by a 1960 B movie and became a 1986 hit film.

Instead of the standard holiday fare on its mainstage, the WaterTower offers Circle Mirror Transformation, by Annie Baker in its Studio Theatre, Nov. 4-21, 2010. Set in a small town’s community acting class, Baker’s comedy follows four students who find out more about themselves than they bargained for. Playwrights Horizons premiered the play last year — and the hit was extended through Jan. 31 this year.  Last week,  Circle Mirror Transformation won an Obie Award for best new American play.

And then there’s the Out of the Loop Fringe Festival, running March 3-13, 2011.

This season also sees the opening nights moved to Mondays. Season tickets range from $85 to $150. Individual tickets are $22 to $40 per show. Call 972-450-6232. Or go online.

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