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Tuesday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 30 Mar 2010

ERYKAH UPDATE: Hunter Hauk at Quick was able to track down Erykah Badu last night to talk about all the hubbub concerning her new video. When asked if she was concerned about the reaction the video would get, she told him, “Yes. I was petrified, period. The whole thing was frightening. The whole idea was […]

CTA TBD

ERYKAH UPDATE: Hunter Hauk at Quick was able to track down Erykah Badu last night to talk about all the hubbub concerning her new video. When asked if she was concerned about the reaction the video would get, she told him, “Yes. I was petrified, period. The whole thing was frightening. The whole idea was frightening. Not being in love with my body, not being secure about being vulnerable. The police coming to take me to jail. I’m breastfeeding right now. Anything I could think of, I did. But those little things diminished as I thought about the big picture. And, as I started to walk, I confronted a lot of fears, and I hoped that it would encourage others to do the same thing in their own way.” Meanwhile, Senior Cpl. Janice Crowther tells dallasnews.com that Badu most likely won’t be charged because no one has come forward to complain.

BUT IS IT ANY GOOD?: Of course, the reason Badu filmed the video was to draw attention to the song “Window Seat” and her newly released album, New Amerykah Part Two: Return of the Ankh. And apparently that’s an album worth drawing attention to. Mario Tarradell gives it an A- in his dallasnews.com review, calling it, “a luxurious, groove-a-licious trip through analog R&B.”

AND NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT: What if you could see some of the world’s masterworks without leaving home. That possibility is coming closer and closer to becoming reality – sort of. The Wall Street Journal reports today about Factum Arte, a Madrid-based company that uses a 3D scanner to make high-resolution copies of artworks. The technique seems to be wowing European crowds – a copy of Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper in Milan (where the real thing is actually housed) attracted 55,000 visitors. In the past, one of the main reasons for traveling to see art was that a replica never could do the original justice. Seeing a picture in a book just doesn’t compare to seeing the real thing. And in the case of The Last Supper, seeing it inside the Santa Maria delle Grazie is a lot different than seeing it hanging in a museum.  But now it appears reproductions can come so close to the original that it’s tough to tell them apart. So the question is: how does knowing a work of art is a copy – even an extremely faithful one – affect your enjoyment of seeing it? Discuss.

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