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Wednesday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 10 Mar 2010

STOP SITTING ON YOUR HANDS: When to applaud? Theatergoers freely clap when a star first walks onstage, at the end of acts or even after musical numbers. And people at pop music concerts are free to hoot and holler whenever the spirit moves them. But classical music concerts are a whole different affair. And Alex […]

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STOP SITTING ON YOUR HANDS: When to applaud? Theatergoers freely clap when a star first walks onstage, at the end of acts or even after musical numbers. And people at pop music concerts are free to hoot and holler whenever the spirit moves them. But classical music concerts are a whole different affair. And Alex Ross things we should change that. Writing in The Guardian, Ross says that classical’s arcane rules for when to applaud and when not to are in a small way responsible for the public’s dwindling interest. “This explains why newcomers exhibit anxiety on the subject; it even appears that fear of incorrect applause can inhibit people from attending concerts, although they may be merely inventing excuses. … The underlying message of the protocol is, in essence: ‘Curb your enthusiasm. Don’t get too excited.’ Should we be surprised that people aren’t as excited about classical music as they used to be?” Put me in the Ross camp.

MUSIC BITS: For once, John Mayer let the music do the talking at his American Airlines Center show Tuesday night. (dfw.com) … The Pointer Sisters showed that they’ve still got it 25 years after their hey day in a nearly sold-out show at the Winspear. (dallasnews.com) … Ahead of his trip to Denton this weekend to play NX35, Wayne Coyne talks about his upcoming film project. (billboard.com) … The Dallas City Council is looking into bringing the music back to Memorial Auditorium. (dallasobserver.com). … Rolling Stone is giving away trips to see Stone Temple Pilots next weekend at SXSW. (rollingstone.com)

MONEY WOES: The Arts of Collin County has been the main coordinator of the future arts complex planned for 100 acres central to Allen, Frisco, Plano and McKinney. But the difficulty in building a complex for four cities is that all four cities have to be on board. (Correction: McKinney hasn’t been part of the process since 2003. Allen, Frisco and Plano are the three cities involved with the project.) And after a Monday city council meeting, there are questions about Frisco’s involvement. The Frisco City Council declined to put a measure on the ballots in May that would ask voters for a bond package to fund the project. That puts more pressure on Arts of Collin County to raise private funding. “If they vote that they can’t sell the bonds, my job just got bigger and harder, and I’ll have to find more money,” Arts of Collin County Executive Director Mike Simpson tells dallasnews.com.

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