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Monday Morning Roundup


by Anne Bothwell 22 Feb 2010

FUNNY STUFF: Without Tex Avery, there’d be no Daffy Duck or Bugs Bunny. And perhaps, without North Dallas High, there’d have been no Tex Avery. Students there are competing to create the best mural honoring the work of one of the school’s most famous alums. I learned that Avery is credited with take, double take […]

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FUNNY STUFF: Without Tex Avery, there’d be no Daffy Duck or Bugs Bunny. And perhaps, without North Dallas High, there’d have been no Tex Avery. Students there are competing to create the best mural honoring the work of one of the school’s most famous alums. I learned that Avery is credited with take, double take so often seen in cartoons. (I.e. the Wolf spots a cutie, looks again, levitates, eyes and heart popping out of his head.)

POCKET PLAY: This Thursday TITAS continues its music series, bringing in uber cool violinist Daniel Bernaud Roumain (aka DBR), to present Darwin’s Meditation for the People of Lincoln at the Wyly. At DallasNews, Manny Mendoza tells us Roumain  goes beyond the coincidence that Darwin and Lincoln were born within hours of each other.  His piece explores the connections in the two men’s personal lives, in an attempt to draw larger political conclusions.  It will be performed by soloists backed by the SMU chamber orchestra and features spoken word performances. Soloists will be backed by SMU’s chamber orchestra.Roumain, whose family is Haitian, found that Darwin and Lincoln had ties there as well. And some proceeds from Thursday’s show will benefit relief in Haiti.

MORE NEW MUSIC NOTES: With deft playing and a little story-telling, Ursula Oppens can help get you over any fear of new music, says Chris Shull of the pianist’s performance at Cliburn at the Modern Series. Her playing is informed by her knowledge of the music and her friendships with many of the composers. … A little wine and conversation can also make new music go down smooth. I enjoyed Voices of Change  performance at Times Ten Cellars Saturday. The group routinely appears the day before major concerts at unexpected venues like Times Ten. It gives a taste of what will be on stage the next day – and a little taste of petite syrah as well.   I couldn’t make Sunday’s show, but it looks like the vino worked: Scott Cantrell praises Voices of Change for offering substantive programs and a challenging piece, Fred Lerdahl’s Pulitzer-finalist chamber work, Time After Time.

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