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A Decade of Innovation in the Arts: Part III


by Stephen Becker 30 Dec 2009

This week, Art&Seek will look at some of the biggest innovations in the arts over the last decade. We’ve asked local experts to blog each day about a significant advancement in how art is created or consumed. By the end of the week, we think you’ll see that things have changed quite a bit in […]

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This week, Art&Seek will look at some of the biggest innovations in the arts over the last decade. We’ve asked local experts to blog each day about a significant advancement in how art is created or consumed. By the end of the week, we think you’ll see that things have changed quite a bit in the last 10 years.

On Monday, Dean Terry, the Director of the Emerging Media + Communication Program and MobileLab at the University of Texas at Dallas, posted about how the Internet has changed the arts. On Tuesday, Michael Auping, Chief Curator of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, wrote that money and architecture have each influenced the visual art world this decade. Today, Jose Bowen picks back up on the technology theme started on Monday. Bowen is a jazz musician and the Dean of the Meadows School of the Arts at SMU:

Technology has allowed the blurring of art forms and the blurring of place and time in a hundred ways. Almost every Broadway show or new theater production now includes video or some use of new technology. The availability of digital video has brought video into many art forms, and we now see music recitals, theater and dance productions, and artists all using video. The line between an experimental filmmaker and a video artist has disappeared. Video is now a part of live performance.

At the same time, performance (via video) is now available everywhere and anytime. Most television is now watched on computer screens. You can watch a movie (or a dance or theater or music performance) on your phone. It has even transformed the museum experience with podcasts.

Everyone now wants to be collaborative. Whether it is Facebook, Twitter or Amazon, everyone wants to comment and post. So in the next 10 years? Much more of the same. Well see movies, productions and music concerts where the audience gets to participate via cellphones. Instant access to live recordings and the ability be a part not only of online content, but actively to participate in live performance, is the future.

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  • The biggest innovation was the art and media revolution. While the mainstream media, including NPR, played it safe and will only cover arts that in no way question anything; independent artists, advocates, and advocacy groups sprouted up to return arts and media to quality.
    Look for those stories! It’s like its 1970 and the media won’t talk about rock and roll!

    This last decade was a golden age of nothing. That includes not only the arts, but the media. When was the last time you heard the media allow any tough critics to question it? That’s like looking through the year end lists, or decade end lists, for the worst media list. Won’t be there.

    The arts and media are in decline as they stand. They’ve earned it.