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Monday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 2 Nov 2009

MERRY WIDOWS: Jubilee Theatre’s Dance on Widow’s Row finds that death can be quite a funny thing – especially if there is a lot of it.  The setting for the show is a dinner party in which a group of widows play host to a few potential husbands/prey. “Given that the quartet of widows who […]

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MERRY WIDOWS: Jubilee Theatre’s Dance on Widow’s Row finds that death can be quite a funny thing – especially if there is a lot of it.  The setting for the show is a dinner party in which a group of widows play host to a few potential husbands/prey. “Given that the quartet of widows who drive the action has combined to bury nine husbands, you may risk dying laughing,” writes Punch Shaw in his dfw.com review. And what’s wrong with a little silliness at the theater? Nothing, says Mark Lowry. Jubilee, “may have discovered the perfect vehicle to offer both a nod to the Tyler Perry crowd and a big ol’ wink to audiences who prefer…wait for it…The Theatre.” If that sounds like your kinda show, you’d better hurry – it only plays through Sunday.

THE MEADOWS, INSIDE AND OUT: Spanish artist Jaume Plensa’s Sho (a.k.a., the giant head sculpture) is the centerpiece of a reconfigured plaza in front of the Meadows Museum on the SMU campus. And to honor its showy acquisition, the museum has unveiled  “Face and Form: Modern and Contemporary Sculpture in the Meadows Collection.” To read Scott Cantrell’s review on dallasnews.com, it sounds like the offerings get better once you leave the plaza and enter the museum. Of the works outside, he calls Santiago Calatrava Wave “decor accessory more than art,” while referring to the new Plensa piece as “art lite.” But inside, he applauds the entire room devoted to former SMU teacher James Surls and is particularly enamored of a pair of John Chamerlain pieces.

AND THE WINNER IS: We frequently link to glasstire.com here at Art&Seek – it gives us a chance to pass along how critics from other parts of the state feel about what’s going on in the North Texas visual arts scene. And it helps us stay up to speed on art happenings in other parts of Texas. So congratulations are in order to its writers and editors for claiming first prize in the National Summit on Arts Journalism. The program rewards projects that best represent the changing face of arts journalism. If you are headed out on a weekend road trip and need suggestions about what you can go see across the state, Glasstire has you covered.

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