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Amon Carter Swaps Works With the Met


by Stephen Becker 27 Oct 2009

The Amon Carter Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York have arranged a temporary trade of a couple of masterworks from each collection. The Carter has loaned out Swimming (1895) by Thomas Eakins and Idle Hours (ca. 1894) by William Merritt Chase for the Met’s current exhibition, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday […]

CTA TBD

ART377999

Lydia Crocheting in the Garden at Marly, by Mary Cassatt

The Amon Carter Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York have arranged a temporary trade of a couple of masterworks from each collection. The Carter has loaned out Swimming (1895) by Thomas Eakins and Idle Hours (ca. 1894) by William Merritt Chase for the Met’s current exhibition, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915. In return, the Carter gets Mary Cassattt’s Lydia Crocheting in the Garden at Marly, Eakins’ The Artist’s Wife and His Setter Dog, the Met’s first-round draft pick in 2010 and a player to be named later. (OK, maybe not those last two things.)

The two Met paintings will be on view in Fort Worth through Jan. 25, 2010. If you’d like to know more about them, the Carter is hosting a free gallery talk about the pair on Nov. 12 at 6 p.m.

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The Artist’s Wife and His Setter Dog, by Thomas Eakins

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  • mse

    love the sports draft reference!

  • nbm

    I’ve seen the Met show, and both Swimming and Idle Hours are great additions — the first in particular, I think.

  • We now have the ability to reproduce paintings on canvas.
    Why not make a copy of the Cassat and the Eakins, and trade copies?
    Some purists might object, but I for one would rather see a thousand copies of a thousand works of Cassat and Eakins, than a single real.
    Change is hard – but imagine what could be done with copies of great paintings. My favorite example is seeing all of Van Gogh’s paintings (copies) in a traveling show. And because it’s copies, it can go to every town in the US without insurance – not just the big cities.