I'm looking for...



Happening:
Anytime
to
Near:
Anywhere
That is
Anything

Wednesday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 17 Jun 2009

FOR THE LOVE OF MUSIC: Tonight’s a big night in Fort Worth. The Lone Star Film Society will screen Before the Music Dies, a documentary that looks into why pop music has become a bland shell of its former self. I spoke with the film’s director, Andrew Shapter, for a Q&A that’s posted in the […]

CTA TBD

FOR THE LOVE OF MUSIC: Tonight’s a big night in Fort Worth. The Lone Star Film Society will screen Before the Music Dies, a documentary that looks into why pop music has become a bland shell of its former self. I spoke with the film’s director, Andrew Shapter, for a Q&A that’s posted in the feature space on Art&Seek. And I also wanted to pass along this story about the film in FW Weekly. The film is well worth your time if you make it out to the Four Day Weekend Theater tonight, but if you can’t make it, you can download the movie for as little as $3.99 here.

A DIFFERENT LOOK: It goes without saying that as artists work through the creative process, their work evolves along with them. That’s a point that JR Compton makes to great effect in his review of a pair of local shows by Norman Kary. A recent show at Bath House Cultural Center featured Kary’s older work, while a current show at Craighhead-Green Gallery focuses on newer pieces. “Sometimes we get so intent making that when we stop and see what we’ve done, it’s changed,” Compton writes. “Then, if we recognize the progress, we might continue it. Planned or unplanned, progress is always iffy.” If you are interested in learning about both the new work and how it got there, consider this required reading.

IS THIS ART?: A Texas deathrow inmate has agreed to donate his body to a Danish artist, who will incorporate it into an art project. Gene Hathorn, a convicted killer housed in the Polunsky Unit in southeast Texas, is still hoping for an appeal. But if he is executed, artist Marco Evaristti will have the body frozen and shipped to Europe, where he will turn it into fish food as part of a fashion/art project. “The fashion show will be forgotten in a short time. People went there, looked at it and were amused. But I want [there to be] a lasting impact and therefore I’m using Hathorn’s body,” Evaristti told The Art Newspaper. If anyone would like to defend how this qualifies as art, the floor is yours.

SHARE
  • That [the fish-food inmate story] is disgusting and, to answer your question, in my opinion it is NOT art.