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Tuesday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 9 Jun 2009

REMEMBERING VIETNAM: Normally, when you go to Photographs Do Not Bend Gallery, you expect to see photos. You will still see photos if you go there now, but for the first time the gallery has made an exception with Don Schol: Vietnam Remembrances. The exhibit features Schol’s woodblock prints depicting scenes from his memory of […]

CTA TBD

REMEMBERING VIETNAM: Normally, when you go to Photographs Do Not Bend Gallery, you expect to see photos. You will still see photos if you go there now, but for the first time the gallery has made an exception with Don Schol: Vietnam Remembrances. The exhibit features Schol’s woodblock prints depicting scenes from his memory of the war. When he’s not making these prints, Schol teaches photography, sculpture and drawing at the University of North Texas. Watch this video to listen to him discuss the meaning behind some of his prints.

THE ADVENTURES OF YEN-HUA LEE: I don’t know how I missed this compelling tale from a few weeks ago, but it’s still a relevant look at the rollercoaster that artists can go through on the way to a gallery show. James Michael Starr tells the story of his friend Yen-Hua Lee, a mixed-media artist living in Dallas who seemed on the brink of every artist’s dream – a show in New York. To add to the excitement, Lee was also planning a show at Dallas Contemporary. Everything seemed to be flowing along nicely until it wasn’t. I’ll let Starr pick up the narrative from there, but I would bet it’s a story that has happened in one form or another to a lot of our local artists.

SERVED UP WITH A TWIST: The reviews are in for WaterTower Theatre’s The Receptionist, Adam Bock’s play that begins as an office comedy before giving way to a surprise. How much you like surprises will go a long way in deciding how much you like The Receptionist. Mark Lowry seems to like them. Reviewing for TheaterJones.com, he says, “Bock’s compact play is a fine example of how to build suspense and keep the audience buzzing about what happened in that relatively short period of time at the theater.” Lawson Taitte, meanwhile, isn’t sure that this twist is deserved. Reviewing for The Dallas Morning News, he says, “I liked The Receptionist better before Bock went into competition with the likes of Pinter and Kafka”

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