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Kitchen Dog Theater’s New Season


by Jerome Weeks 26 Apr 2009

Last week, at opening night of Kitchen Dog Theater‘s current campy, bloody Mayan version of Titus Andronicus, artistic director Tina Parker had fun telling the audience that the company’s new season would be announced soon. Actually, it seemed almost as if she were taunting us to get on their e-mail list. If you didn’t take […]

CTA TBD

Last week, at opening night of Kitchen Dog Theaters current campy, bloody Mayan version of Titus Andronicus, artistic director Tina Parker had fun telling the audience that the company’s new season would be announced soon. Actually, it seemed almost as if she were taunting us to get on their e-mail list. If you didn’t take the bait, shame on you, but here’s the new schedule anyway, only a week late.

  • The Southwest premiere of Noah Haidle’s Vigils (Sept. 11-Oct. 10), which premiered at the Goodman in Chicago in 2006. Haidle likes time-shifting, character-splitting techniques (Saturn Returns in New York last year, Mr. Marmalade, which Kitchen Dog has presented) and Vigils has a widow who keeps the soul of her dead fireman-husband in a box, while his body still wanders around.
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    Playwright Allison Moore

  • With Slasher (Nov. 13-Dec. 12), the Kitchen Doggers return to the work of Allison Moore for the fourth time (after Hazard County, Eighteen and End Times, a Kitchen Dog world premiere). An SMU grad, Moore seems to have taken several pages from Saw. An Austin, Texas feminist mom in a wheelchair chains her daughter to a radiator — rather than let her star in a slasher flick. It’s Moore’s second play to be featured at the Humana Festival.
  • Not to be confused with the Tennessee Williams’ play (and film), Peter Sinn Nachtrieb’s boom (Feb. 12-March 13) finds a journalism student and marine biologist having a bit of fun in an underground lab — the fun happens to include the possible end of the world. Texas premiere.
  • Funny how the Undermain’s current production of Anton Chekhov’s The Black Monk recalls the playwright’s The Seagull (and his Cherry Orchard as well). Next year, the Dogs will offer a handy comparison with a revival of The Seagull directed by Cameron Cobb (April 9-May 10)
  • Among the different staged readings and whatnot, the New Works Festival (May 28-June 29) will feature Zayd Dohrn’s Long Way Go Down about a Mexican couple who are abandoned by the “coyotes” who smuggled them across the border.

Season subscriptions (for five plays) are $100. A Flex Pass — for five single-use admission however you want throughout the season — is $125. Subscriptions go on sale May 1. Call 214-953-1055.

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