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Thursday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 9 Apr 2009

THE WRITING ON THE WALL: When you spend more than $300 million constructing a pair of buildings, there are lots of details to consider. One of them is how you are going to inform people about the building they are entering. Signage takes all forms, from the chest-thumping grandeur of a team logo on a […]

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THE WRITING ON THE WALL: When you spend more than $300 million constructing a pair of buildings, there are lots of details to consider. One of them is how you are going to inform people about the building they are entering. Signage takes all forms, from the chest-thumping grandeur of a team logo on a football field to the blink and you might miss it subtlety of an office building. The designers for the Dallas Center for the Performing Arts are leaning toward the latter, according to a story today on GuideLive. The reasoning? “When this center opens, no one is ever going to mistake what building is the Winspear Opera House and which building is the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre,” says Doug Curtis, vice president for design and construction for the DCPA. “There are no other buildings in North Texas or maybe in the state of Texas that look like these buildings.”

A DEAL FOR DIONNE: If you want to see a music legend and benefit a good cause, I’ve got a deal for you. Dionne Warwick will be in town on April 18 for Curtain Call, a benefit concert that helps the Dallas Summer Musicals teach the kids about theater and music. The DSM sends word that they have set aside some tickets in the Music Hall at Fair Park for $35 and $50. Not bad, considering ticket packages for the night run up to $500. If that sounds like something you might be interested, you can purchase tickets here.

TURN, TURN, TURN: There’s plenty of arts jobs that we don’t ever take much time to consider. One of the more interesting ones is the page turner – the hands that must somehow get into the mind of the soloist and know the precise moment to flip to the next page of the score. The Wall Street Journal talked to some page turners for this informative and very funny piece that ran this week. You would think that the ability to read music would be mandatory, but as it turns out, sometimes that just mucks things up. “I don’t even need page turners to read music just as long as they look at me and see me nod that it’s time to turn the page,” says pianist Joseph Kalichstein. “The page turner gets involved in the score and I get totally ignored.”

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