I'm looking for...



Happening:
Anytime
to
Near:
Anywhere
That is
Anything

SXSW Interactive: ScreenBurn


by April Kinser 13 Mar 2009

I just got out of the ScreenBurn Arcade, one of the video game components to the SXSW Interactive Festival, and was truly impressed. Open to the public, the arcade showcases the latest and most cutting-edge innovations in the gaming industry. Walking into the arcade, you’re assaulted with dozens of flat-screen televisions and even more gamers […]

CTA TBD

Alexander Ringe of COmplexity Games in New York plays Bionic Commando for the first time as friends watch on.

Alexander Ringe of Complexity Games in New York plays Bionic Commando for the first time as friends watch on.

I just got out of the ScreenBurn Arcade, one of the video game components to the SXSW Interactive Festival, and was truly impressed.

Open to the public, the arcade showcases the latest and most cutting-edge innovations in the gaming industry.

Walking into the arcade, you’re assaulted with dozens of flat-screen televisions and even more gamers waiting for their chance to play games that aren’t on the market yet.

One visitor, Yfran Garcia of Complexity Games in New York, said he was “stoked” to be trying out Capcom’s latest third-person shooter game, Bionic Commando.

“This game’s amazing,” Garcia said. “Even in Halo you can’t do some of the things you’re doing in this game.”

Marc Diana, a merchandiser for the Bionic Commando booth, said that’s exactly the type of interest they are looking for.

“All the feedback I get from the players today, I’m taking back to the developer,” Diana said. “In this way, ScreenBurn is invaluable to us.”

A young gamer takes on Ghouls and Ghosts, a video game from the '80s.

A young gamer takes on Ghouls and Ghosts, a video game from the '80s.

But fret not if you long for the days of Dungeons and Dragons and Super Mario Bros.

One booth in the arcade  is set up like a living room straight out of the ’80s, complete with all the games you long to play from the old days.

Scott Holmes, a representative of the booth set up by Mountain Dew, said the company wanted to bring a nostalgic feel to ScreenBurn.

“Of course you’re going to have the latest and greatest here, but we felt people might want to play something a little retro,” Holmes said.

Austin resident John Survis, brought his son to Screenburn for the first time and was immediately drawn to the older games.

“We have a Nintendo Wii at home,” Survis said. “I wanted him to see what games were like when I was a kid.”

SHARE