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Tuesday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 3 Mar 2009

NO ROOM IN THE INN: Thinking of going to the George Strait concert June 6 that will mark the official opening of the new Cowboys stadium in Arlington? Think again. Officially, the concert is a sellout, though there may still be the odd single ticket left here and there. It’s unclear still how many tickets […]

CTA TBD

NO ROOM IN THE INN: Thinking of going to the George Strait concert June 6 that will mark the official opening of the new Cowboys stadium in Arlington? Think again. Officially, the concert is a sellout, though there may still be the odd single ticket left here and there. It’s unclear still how many tickets were sold, but the guess is between 80,000-100,000.

DOUG BURR TAKES OVER LOCAL MEDIA: Did you catch Paul Slavens’ interview with Doug Burr in his inaugural Track by Track podcast? The new feature will run bi-weekly on Art&Seek and feature local musicians going through their albums song by song with Paul. Now, DFW.com has also caught up with the Denton singer-songwriter for its Local Music Profile. Good to see the locals doing their best to foster the music scene around here.

AMON CARTER ANNOUNCES NEW SHOW: “The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Collection of African-American Art: Works on Paper” will open June 6 at the Amon Carter Museum and run through Aug. 23. The show features works from more than 50 African American artists and spans the last 200 years. To complement the show, the museum will stage a one-gallery exhibition of African American highlights from its collection. You can read the full announcement here.

READING FOR THE BUS: Are you one of the people catching the bus this afternoon to drive down to Austin for Lobby Day? The event is sponsored by the Texas Motion Picture Alliance in an effort to draw better incentives from the state to attract more projects. If you are making the trip, you might consider printing out this story from today’s New York Times (or just picking up a copy when you grab your morning latte at Starbucks). The film and television industry in New York is also trying to solidify its incentive program, and advocates argue that by extending it, 19,000 jobs will be preserved and more than $200 million will be added to the tax roll. The state has already paid out $690 million through the program, but that money is expected to yield close to $2.7 billion in project spending. In this climate, that seems like a pretty good investment.

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