I'm looking for...



Happening:
Anytime
to
Near:
Anywhere
That is
Anything

Wednesday Morning Roundup


by Stephen Becker 7 Jan 2009

A NEW LIFE FOR JUNK: The DIY movement is going strong into 2009. All you have to do is read guest blogger Lydia Regalado’s recent roundup of area classes that channel students’ creativity to make useful objects out of the simplest of materials. It appears some artists have taken the concept to the extreme, using […]

CTA TBD

A NEW LIFE FOR JUNK: The DIY movement is going strong into 2009. All you have to do is read guest blogger Lydia Regalado’s recent roundup of area classes that channel students’ creativity to make useful objects out of the simplest of materials.

It appears some artists have taken the concept to the extreme, using recycled materials to create works of art. These “eco artists” use aluminum cans, cardboard boxes and plastic shopping bags to make everything from purses to centerpieces. A favorite is a bra made entirely of old Tab cans.

These artists have been helped by a downturn in the recyclables market. Recycled material is traded on the open market just like crude oil and pork bellies, and with the demand for it down, it can be easier to find if you know where to look.

ART FAIRS FIND THEIR PLACE: I have to admit that I have been a little skeptical about February’s Dallas Art Fair. Art Basel saw weaker sales last month in Miami while New York’s Asian Art Fair was canceled this year. How successful can the Dallas event be if those more established markets suffered?

After reading this though, my mind is starting to change a bit. The idea is basically that some galleries are putting more emphasis on art fairs than their standard gallery sales. The thinking is that to compete with auction houses, it’s necessary to bring the work to the people. It seems that the fairs are becoming an economic necessity for galleries, and even if they don’t sell as much as in past years, it’s better than staying home for the weekend.

The Dallas Art Fair will bring some 30 galleries from around the world to town and will provide an opportunity to see what’s going on elsewhere without leaving home. It may also give us an idea as to how much the global economic downturn has affected local collectors’ abilities to add to their collections.

SHARE