I'm looking for...



Happening:
Anytime
to
Near:
Anywhere
That is
Anything

DIY: Velvet Painting Follow-Up


by Lydia Regalado 17 Jul 2008

Curator Viola Delgado looks on as Benito Huerta prepares his paints for his painting on velvet demonstration last Saturday. Guest blogger Lydia Regalado writes about people who gather to make things. Texas artist Benito Huerta demonstrated his technique for velvet painting this past Saturday in conjunction with his solo exhibition Maestros Tejanos at the Latino […]

CTA TBD

Curator Viola Delgado looks on as Benito Huerta prepares his paints for his painting on velvet demonstration last Saturday.

Guest blogger Lydia Regalado writes about people who gather to make things.
Texas artist Benito Huerta demonstrated his technique for velvet painting this past Saturday in conjunction with his solo exhibition Maestros Tejanos at the Latino Cultural Center. For his demonstration, Benito began with a drawing on a stretched canvas, then carefully traced and transferred the drawing with pastel on to the velvet, which he stretched over the canvas.

Next, he demonstrated the angle in which he holds his brush and applies oil paints to the surface. As he worked, Benito spoke about the history of the velvet paintings, his process of trial and error, offered advice and answered questions.

Did you know that velvet paintings have been around since the 14th century? As for his advice: use a cotton velvet as opposed to a velvet madeof synthetic fibers; use the black background to enhance shadows; and be aware of the mid-tones, should you decide to paint on a colored velvet such as red. This was a great demonstration and very informative! I’m sure the Velveteria will be displaying a work of art from DFW soon!

Benito’s demonstration was part of the Second Saturdays! programming at the Latino Cultural Center, and occur every second Saturday of the month. Among the many programs offered are dance and craft workshops that are free to the public. This past Saturday a salsa dance workshop was led by the Ollimpaxqui Dance Company, as well as a craft workshop led by artist Sal Barrón where we made “Ojos de Dios” out of yarn and dowels. The workshops are three hours, providing in-depth instruction and time to perfect your steps, or complete a project. This is the best deal in town for the level of programming and fun. Mark your calendars for the next Second Saturday! which will take place August 9. These are structured programs with limited space, so call ahead to sign up and reserve your spot, and be sure to arrive on time.

Next Up:

Buchanan Market
If you are in the market for your own velvet painting, check out Buchanan Market this weekend in Dallas. Specializing in antiques and collectibles, Buchanan Market has taken place every month in Dallas since 1995. The market is held at Fair Park in the Automobile Building (Gate 4). This weekend: July 19-20, Saturday 9 am – 5 pm, and Sunday 11 am – 5 pm. Parking is free and admission is $3 for adults, children under 12 get in free. Admission is good for both days.
See you there!

SHARE
  • Buchanan Markets are great fun! I love them. But beware, the construction in front of Fair Park continues for its 1,000th year. How long does it take to do a block of pavement?