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Roundup: Kitchen Dog new works, new New Year, old punks


by Manuel Mendoza 22 May 2008

Lee Trull is everywhere. Now the 28-year-old playwright, theater administrator, and actor with membership in two companies is here, too — Kitchen Dog Theater’s New Works Festival, which stages a reading of Trull’s play, Tall Thin Walls of Regret, set in Cold War-era Dallas, along with six others next month. The festival also includes a […]

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Lee Trull is everywhere. Now the 28-year-old playwright, theater administrator, and actor with membership in two companies is here, too — Kitchen Dog Theater’s New Works Festival, which stages a reading of Trull’s play, Tall Thin Walls of Regret, set in Cold War-era Dallas, along with six others next month. The festival also includes a “Pup Fest” of student work and a full main stage production, Sick, which stars guess who.

thenewyear.jpg

One of the best bands ever to come out of Dallas if I do say so myself, and I do, is The New Year, which spun off from another unbelievable local outfit, Bedhead. Anyway, the brothers Kadane and their able sidemen, including Deep Ellum legend Peter Schmidt, have a new album coming out on Touch and Go on Sept. 9, and Unfair Park has uncovered a cryptic trailer video on YouTube. Whet your whistle, pull out that dusty copy of WhatFunLifeWas and go see them play at Lola’s in Fort Worth on June 27 and/or Dallas’ Granada Theater on June 28.

At last night’s Police/Elvis Costello concert, a reversed bill would have been just fine with moi. Costello’s sound was muddy and his set was short, the price of being the opening act. (Reminds me of that old Woody Allen joke about a restaurant where the food is bad and the portions small.) Still, he and his Imposters added a sense of event to several old and new songs, particularly the modulated chorus of “Everyday I Write the Book,” the buildups in “Flutter & Wow” and “Go Away” and the already eventful “Watching the Detectives,” which they made even noir-ier. I would have preferred “(I Don’t Want to Go to) Chelsea” or “Lipstick Vogue” in place of war-horse “Pump It Up,” as on other dates. As Randy Jackson would say, the Police were aiight. Here’s what Robert Philpot and Chris Vognar thought.

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